Daniel Potter: The impact of a participant-centred sport for social change pilot intervention project in the UK

This study explores the impact of a participant-centred sport for social change pilot intervention project in the UK with a group of vulnerable people aged 16-25 years old. The project was run by the University of Chichester and Sanctuary Supported Living between January 2013 and March 2013 with the aim of breaking down social barriers.

While sport for social change interventions have been examined to play a central role in social development (Burnett, 2006; Sugden, 2006; Coakley, 2012), there is dearth of literature which addresses the impact of a participant-centred sport intervention project. This study utilises a qualitative methodology drawing on six in-depth semi structured interviews and also a series of focus groups.

This study found that the malleable nature of the participant-centred intervention allowed for the project to be tailored to the needs of the participants, thus empowering them in decision making. The non-hierarchical delivery provided a basis for the development of confidence, self-esteem and teamwork. This study found that the method of delivery used helped to provide a platform to break down barriers in society which can be used beyond just sport, counter arguing criticisms of sport for social change projects vague framework (Coalter, 2010).

Download poster: Daniel Potter CREST Symposium Poster 2013