Glyndwr Head of Research Centre for Health, Wellbeing and Society chosen for Welsh Crucible

A leading health expert was among the headliners at a prestigious science research symposium.

Dr Lynne Kennedy, Head of the Research Centre for Health, Wellbeing and Society at Glyndŵr University, was among a select group of academics chosen to participate in this year’s Welsh Crucible in Cardiff.

Dr Kennedy, who hosted the European Training Consortium summer school in Public Health at the Wrexham University last summer, was selected as a promising academic leader in public health policy and practice, from across all universities in Wales.

Her interests lie in preventing disease and promoting health and well-being in populations. She is also involved in several local and national initiatives around obesity and weight management, maternal and child health and community well-being.

Funded by the St David’s Day group of higher education institutions and the Higher Education Funding Council for Wales, Welsh Crucible brings together 30 researchers to explore how they can work together to tackle the current health challenges facing Wales.

It was an opportunity for Dr Kennedy to work alongside key funding council members and senior government advisers on developing the future research agenda in Wales and to identify collaborative opportunities.

Dr Kennedy said: “It was a real honour to be chosen to speak at the Welsh Crucible and represent Glyndŵr University at such an important event.

“It’s so rare to be given the opportunity to talk to people from different disciplines to solve complex issues. For example, people working in neurosciences, quantum physics or the human genome, discussing novel ways to work together to address current problems such as weight management and obesity or cancer prevention.”

She added: “By talking across scientific communities and pooling ideas we are hoping to develop new research to tackle issues from a completely different and hopefully successful direction.”

The Welsh Crucible is a programme of personal, professional and leadership development for highly promising research leaders of the future who are building their careers in Wales.

It aims to help participants discover how other early to mid-career researchers in other disciplines are tackling the same issues as them, and how they can transfer the knowledge to the public sphere to make an impact.

Those in attendance also looked at how to think creatively about their work and careers and implement new skills to make their research more innovative.

A Welsh Crucible spokesperson thanked Dr Kennedy for her involvement, adding:  “Lynne is an excellent candidate for Welsh Crucible as she is already engaging with the philosophy and making collaborations and building networks outside of her usual discipline.

“This is exactly what we hope to come out of the programme – excellent researchers thinking and working in new ways, forging productive collaborations for the benefit of the local community and for Wales.”

Dr Kennedy will play an active role in this year’s Alcohol Concern Cymru conference, to be held at Glyndŵr University’s Catrin Finch Centre in association with CAIS on September 18.

For more information, visit the alcohol concer n website:  www.alcoholconcern.org.uk